BTS’s Suga, who recently talked about how he’s not fond of how masculinity is defined today, is also an advocate for the youth and the struggles they go through today.

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Aside from these topics, he always plays a huge role in emphasizing the importance of acceptance and breaking down stereotypes and barriers in the world.

As a celebrity, isn’t it difficult to reveal your personal struggles and pain?

I think the people that have the platform should talk about these topics more. Because depression is something you get diagnosed with at the hospital. But you don’t know you have it until you hear it from the doctor.

⁠— Suga, Entertainment Weekly Interview

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So, not only us, but also other celebrities, should talk openly about these things. For instance, if we talk about depression the way we talk about the common cold, depression can be just like a cold or a common sickness, and it will be more easily accepted.

⁠— Suga, Entertainment Weekly Interview

Artists and celebrities who have the voice to speak about this should talk about these issues more and bring these topics up to the surface.

⁠— Suga, Entertainment Weekly Interview

In BTS’s most recent album BE, the lyrics to the track “DIS-EASE” also talks about these issues.

Everybody’s got a lot of diseases, I’m confused by that

That humankind is inherently disgusting

400 more cases of heart disease

There aren’t many people that don’t work

Yo, is it the world or me that’s sick?

Is it just a difference in interpretation?

I don’t know if that’s all

I don’t know how to change someone

Something faster than that is me changing

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During a Billboard interview, the topic of LGBT rights came up and Suga’s answer was firm and clear.

I don’t see what’s wrong. People are made equal.

⁠— Suga

Fans of idols are sometimes viewed as thoughtless teenage girls.

It doesn’t make sense to talk or fight about this problem. Honestly, I don’t understand people who look down on certain music genres. It doesn’t matter what the genre is. Classic music was also pop music at the time. It’s a matter of personal taste and understanding. ‘It’s right, it’s wrong’ or ‘that’s culture, that’s vulgar’, these are not it.

⁠— Suga, The Guardian Interview

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During the behind footage from the U.N speech, Suga stated, “A lot of idol fans receive hate…but they are really amazing people. Just because you like someone doesn’t mean you can do the things that they do, honestly.”

Suga continues to put his words to action by tirelessly working towards bringing acceptance towards diversity while breaking down stereotypes and barriers.