SBS‘s new educational variety program, Between You launched their first regular episode and they are starting off on a strong note. The show gives a platform to different conspiracy theories while the panel discusses all the ins and outs of the stories.

On the April 28 episode, the SBS show talked about the infamous Burning Sun Scandal and the conspiracy surrounding the mysterious death of detective Lee Yong Jun.

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Detective Lee Yong Jun | SBS

Detective Lee Yong Jun, who worked for the Gangnam Police Department, was found dead in a reservoir two days after receiving a unknown phone call. He was working on the Burning Sun Scandal at the time of his death, which raised even more suspicions. After just one month of investigating Lee Yong Jun’s sudden death, the case was closed, ruling suicide as the cause of death.

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Caption: “Even after re-investigation, the death was ruled a suicide and the case was closed.” | SBS

To this, police officer A shared that he began to ask questions regarding the suspicious investigation. However, officer A revealed that after he began asking questions, he was removed from the case and reassigned to a different department.

I found out that something was wrong with the initial investigation so I voiced my suspicions. I was kicked out and put into the civil affairs department.

— Officer A

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Police officer A | SBS

Officer A further shared that while he filed a petition to fight against the abuse of authority he received, the case was swept under the rug without any form of punishment.

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Reporter interviewing officer A | SBS

The Burning Sun Scandal previously shocked the nation as numerous celebrities, K-Pop stars and police officials were named. The sex scandal involved illegal sexually explicit videos and photos of women that were shared amongst dozens of men. As the investigation became public, allegations of police bribery and corruption were made, further igniting the deeply rooted issue of police corruption in South Korea.

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Seungri at one of his Burning Sun trials | LA Times